Panos Liakos

The Prince and The Tin Box

I am from Greece, studying Cinema Studies (MA) in NYU and a huge fan of Cornelia Funke and Guillermo del Toro. Recently I offered their book, Pan's Labyrinth, as a gift to my girlfriend. Instead of obvious wishes for a name day, I wrote for her a very small fable.

Once upon a time there was a little prince who grew up abruptly. Wounded by the rough battles of his life, all he had been left was his heart, which he now kept in a tin box. Α rainy day in December he was wandering into the woods. He was so cold that found a holler in a tree trunk and hid himself in there, like a fetus. He took his last breath. Α doe was playing gracefully around the tree and found our prince: he was pale, yet he was holding the tin box in his hands. Galloping like a horse, the beautiful doe arrived in the palace of the Nymph of the Woods. She was a princess too, but her heart was equally wounded. As soon as she learned about the poor prince, she gathered her fellowship, ordered for her carriage to get ready and, in a few moments, she was in front of the young man's soulless body. The Nymph examined the prince's body - a body that has lost its strength but should have been muscular and athletic once. The truth is, actually, that more than his body her attention was been attracted by the tin box in his hands. The little heart in there did not move any more. The Nymph very carefully removed it out of its prison and blew on it. She wished from the bottom of her heart to warm the still organ in the box. Instantly, the blood begun to make prince's face more and more red. In a few more moments, our prince even opened his eyes. His eyes met Nymph's eyes. The two pairs of eyes loved each other at once. The Nymph ordered the carriage to transfer them in the palace as securely as possible. During the short trip, they did not exchange even a word but their eyes were sparkling and telling the most tender love words. It was snowing. Three days before Christmas Eve. The Nymph and the Prince were looking out of the carriage, the palace was emerging more and more clear now. The fellowship of the Nymph, the fairies, had put the heart into its place - our prince was now smiling again. He threw the tin box out of the carriage and took Nymph's hand into his. She smiled back at him. Their own fable has just begun.