Rosie Anne Smith Artist from Birmingham, England

Photo: Michael Orth

Photo: Michael Orth

Rosie is a young artist from Birmingham, England. Together with Helena Park she graduated with a BA in Fine Art from Falmouth University. Rosie works in Sydney at an art gallery and has her own studio.

Website
Photo: Michael Orth

Photo: Michael Orth

When did you start making art?

I started making artwork during college, which would be, jeez, seven years ago. I'd chosen to study analogue photography. And loved it. I loved the way you could manipulate the light, composition, even the contact sheets were visually intriguing. And over the years this has spread over different mediums. I now focus my energy on painting, but still lean back on photographs as inspiration.

Photo: Michael Orth

Photo: Michael Orth

How did the opportunity for you to come to Cornelia's farm come about?

A good friend and artist, Helena Park, had originally got in touch with Cornelia with regards to the residency and invited me along. It was a gamble for Cornelia to have me stay and work as we had never met beforehand. I'm very thankful she took that gamble.

Photo: Michael Orth

Photo: Michael Orth

How has your stay been, and did you find inspiration for your work?

My time in Malibu was magical, the property and people have an incredible affect on you. Amongst the midst of this beautiful, calming landscape, there's an air of rebellion and so much life. I found myself challenging my work each day. What was the driving force? What should it say? Does it need to say anything? These are all questions I would not have been able to answer, if it wasn't for my time and the conversations I had at the farm. And since, I've noticed my artwork change entirely. That stay gave me the understanding I needed.

Photo: Michael Orth

Photo: Michael Orth

What will you take away from this experience?

Not to sound like a complete romantic, but the absolute necessity for art. It allows a space for us all to understand and express humanity. Art lifts the heart, saddens it and compels us to act. Or even for the simplicity of making something look visually stunning. It's needed, and I'm very excited to somewhat be a part of the conversation.

Photo: Michael Orth

Photo: Michael Orth

Photo: Michael Orth

Photo: Michael Orth

Photo: Michael Orth

Photo: Michael Orth

Photo: Michael Orth

Photo: Michael Orth